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Friday, February 17 • 11:25 - 12:15
Lightning Talks II

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Jörg Pfründer: Three important data points for every request and every message

How can you control authentication and authorization in a distributed application of several micro services?How to aggregate your logging data to find relevant information in case of an error?How do you implement feature toggling?
How to avoid a single point of failure for these aspects?
I'm going to present three kinds of important metadata. We annotate every request and every message with these data points to handle those cross cutting concerns over service boundaries.

Markus Krogemann: Who slowed us down? I want my monolith back!

Yes, a somewhat provocative title for a Microservices conference. However, it summarises a tale that I have now heard from more organisations than I had wished for.
This is not to say that Microservices tend to slow you down. Instead, it captures the realisation that Microservices require organisational and team capabilities, that may not always be in place and which are not readily available but rather limited in supply.
Having voiced these concerns, here is what I intend to put forward in my talk:An approach that has repeatedly worked for me and the organisations I worked with in the context of new projects (read: Startups).
1) Start with a well designed monolith! The talk will provide more intuition on what characterises a well designed monolith.2) Given that you have built a well designed monolith, split it up into Microservices, as soon as you have evidence that the expected benefits pay back for any additional efforts required to make them work smoothly in your organisation. As soon as you have the evidence, but not before!
The changes required may be extensive and you need to account for them in order to avoid the slow-down that I mentioned earlier.They regularly involve changes to existing or altogether new deployment automations, monitoring infrastructures and debugging/tracing solutions. Also: developers will need to learn about technologies that may be new to them (Kubernetes, networking in containers, etc.).
The expected benefits of course are increased team autonomy and an ability to go faster, provided you manage to properly align the team efforts towards providing more / better value to your customers. And you will be able to reap them, if you don't forget to cater for the required steps in your organisational development.
Finally, the talk will also highlight how Functional Programming and Elixir/OTP can help on your journey towards a well designed monolith.

Benjamin Kampmann: Beyond the microservice: decentralising the entire infrastructure

At its core, the microservice movement is about splitting bigger responsibilities into a network of responsibilities: we decentralise our processes, package to deploy them independently from each other and the underlying hardware. To make it easier to maintain, scale and to make it more reliable, we try to reduce the points of failures in our network: just because one machine goes down, our app and service should not. On the other side, our Internet (infrastructure) is highly centralised and siloed. 
In this lighting talk, we will explore what it would mean to take these learnings out of the data centres and applied them to the internet at large. Could we globally decentralise computation and data? What would that look like? How would we route and access them? What would our services looks like and interact with one another?

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Kampmann

Benjamin Kampmann

Benjamin Kampmann is a freelance Open Source Software Developer and Educator living in Berlin. He designs, builds and supervises the building of software (systems). Sometimes for clients, often on his own, whenever possible as OpenSource. He cares about good design on both sides: the product and user experience as well as a robust technological architecture and infrastructure. Even more, he cares about people; he mentors and coaches, writes and... Read More →
avatar for Markus Krogemann

Markus Krogemann

For the past 18 years, Markus has worked across many business domains and organisations. | That's 18 years of paradigm shifts, technology hypes, some good learnings and a sizeable number of things that have long since been forgotten about. | He has acted as Developer, Consultant, Co-Founder and CTO, and also as part-time conference speaker, open-source developer and occasional blogger.
avatar for Jörg Pfründer

Jörg Pfründer

Jörg Pfründer is software developer at EUROPACE AG, Germany's largest mortgage loan market place.


Friday February 17, 2017 11:25 - 12:15
Gallery (1st floor)